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Question: A patient is ready for discharge when she spikes a fever of 101.3°F. A call to the physician results in an order for IV antibiotics to be administered every 12 hours for 48 hours.

31 Jan 2023,6:15 PM


A patient is ready for discharge when she spikes a fever of 101.3°F. A call to the physician results in an order for IV antibiotics to be administered every 12 hours for 48 hours. The patient’s family arrives to take her home, and they discover that she now has an IV and will not be discharged for 2 days. They ask, “What happened? Did our mother catch something in the hospital? We thought this is a place of healing.” How will you respond? Your response may have legal implications.


Describe one strategy you will incorporate in your practice to ensure that you are providing evidence-based care in the prevention of HAIs.
Cite your references in proper APA Style.

Expert answer

What?

Kolb’s experiential learning model, which I apply throughout this reflection on my learning in week 3, defines effective learning situations as concrete learning experiences that challenge one’s prior learning and beliefs (Morris, 2020). The learning activities I participated in during week 3 provided a concrete learning experience, particularly because they allowed me to critically appraise my prior understanding and beliefs about business ethics. Specifically, the ethical dilemma case study in the Northouse text concerning Mr. Brown and the PEO that we discussed during the week expanded my comprehension of what constitutes an effective, ethical framework to apply when facing difficult situations in the business management context (Northouse, 2018). I came into this learning process assuming that I was biased in favor of virtue, duty, and utilitarian ethics approaches over the equally significant justice, egoism, and caring ethical orientations (Carroll and Brown, 2022; Muenjohn et al., 2018). Before the week’s learning, I would have responded to the hypothetical case study by immediately canceling the problematic contract once I identified that it was overpriced without considering the other relevant ethical issues of racial justice, fairness, and staff demotivation (Ferrell et al., 2021). However, because of the learning experience during the week, I gained a deeper appreciation of the significance of a situational ethics approach, whereby it is more effective to implement ethical decision-making that considers the entire range of contextual variables defining an ethical dilemma (Trevino and Nelson, 2021). A situational ethics approach facilitates more effective ethical decision-making because it provides an equal balance to all relevant ethical orientations when considering the feasible solutions for an ethical dilemma, including justice, utilitarianism, caring, egoism, duty, and virtue ethics.

So What?

Completing the ethical leadership questionnaire was another significant highlight of the concrete learning experiences I gained throughout the week. The most important aspect of this learning experience was that it allowed me to measure my ethical leadership and identify improvement areas, including the components of ethical leadership I need to improve. The aspect that was most surprising for me after completing the questionnaire was that the scores needed to fully reflect my prior assumptions regarding my ethical orientation as a manager and leader before the week’s learning. As the appendix at the end of the paper illustrates, I score highest in duty, caring, and justice ethics. In contrast, I had initially assumed that my leadership approach is also strongest in virtue and practical ethics. Only my high scores in duty ethics were consistent with my prior assumptions. Additionally, the exercise revealed that I scored zero in egoism and virtue ethics, highlighting these two aspects as the ethical leadership areas I need to focus on in my future leadership development.

Now What?

Overall, I have learned that to be an effective, ethical leader, I need to embrace a holistic leadership development approach that will enable me to change the zero scores in virtue and egoism ethics to higher scores. Although I have compromised my ethics in organizational life, I recognize that improving my virtue leadership score requires me to develop greater knowledge of organizational policies and other sources of positive ethics, such as laws and regulations, to ground my ethical decision-making on what is always virtuous and right. For example, I recognize that situations like conspiracies to falsify financial information do not require situational ethics at all. Understanding what is morally right or unethical in black-and-white ethical dilemmas will help me strengthen my virtue ethics orientation, thereby protecting myWhat?

Kolb’s experiential learning model, which I apply throughout this reflection on my learning in week 3, defines effective learning situations as concrete learning experiences that challenge one’s prior learning and beliefs (Morris, 2020). The learning activities I participated in during week 3 provided a concrete learning experience, particularly because they allowed me to critically appraise my prior understanding and beliefs about business ethics. Specifically, the ethical dilemma case study in the Northouse text concerning Mr. Brown and the PEO that we discussed during the week expanded my comprehension of what constitutes an effective, ethical framework to apply when facing difficult situations in the business management context (Northouse, 2018). I came into this learning process assuming that I was biased in favor of virtue, duty, and utilitarian ethics approaches over the equally significant justice, egoism, and caring ethical orientations (Carroll and Brown, 2022; Muenjohn et al., 2018). Before the week’s learning, I would have responded to the hypothetical case study by immediately canceling the problematic contract once I identified that it was overpriced without considering the other relevant ethical issues of racial justice, fairness, and staff demotivation (Ferrell et al., 2021). However, because of the learning experience during the week, I gained a deeper appreciation of the significance of a situational ethics approach, whereby it is more effective to implement ethical decision-making that considers the entire range of contextual variables defining an ethical dilemma (Trevino and Nelson, 2021). A situational ethics approach facilitates more effective ethical decision-making because it provides an equal balance to all relevant ethical orientations when considering the feasible solutions for an ethical dilemma, including justice, utilitarianism, caring, egoism, duty, and virtue ethics.

So What?

Completing the ethical leadership questionnaire was another significant highlight of the concrete learning experiences I gained throughout the week. The most important aspect of this learning experience was that it allowed me to measure my ethical leadership and identify improvement areas, including the components of ethical leadership I need to improve. The aspect that was most surprising for me after completing the questionnaire was that the scores needed to fully reflect my prior assumptions regarding my ethical orientation as a manager and leader before the week’s learning. As the appendix at the end of the paper illustrates, I score highest in duty, caring, and justice ethics. In contrast, I had initially assumed that my leadership approach is also strongest in virtue and practical ethics. Only my high scores in duty ethics were consistent with my prior assumptions. Additionally, the exercise revealed that I scored zero in egoism and virtue ethics, highlighting these two aspects as the ethical leadership areas I need to focus on in my future leadership development.

Now What?

Overall, I have learned that to be an effective, ethical leader, I need to embrace a holistic leadership development approach that will enable me to change the zero scores in virtue and egoism ethics to higher scores. Although I have compromised my ethics in organizational life, I recognize that improving my virtue leadership score requires me to develop greater knowledge of organizational policies and other sources of positive ethics, such as laws and regulations, to ground my ethical decision-making on what is always virtuous and right. For example, I recognize that situations like conspiracies to falsify financial information do not require situational ethics at all. Understanding what is morally right or unethical in black-and-white ethical dilemmas will help me strengthen my virtue ethics orientation, thereby protecting myWhat?

Kolb’s experiential learning model, which I apply throughout this reflection on my learning in week 3, defines effective learning situations as concrete learning experiences that challenge one’s prior learning and beliefs (Morris, 2020). The learning activities I participated in during week 3 provided a concrete learning experience, particularly because they allowed me to critically appraise my prior understanding and beliefs about business ethics. Specifically, the ethical dilemma case study in the Northouse text concerning Mr. Brown and the PEO that we discussed during the week expanded my comprehension of what constitutes an effective, ethical framework to apply when facing difficult situations in the business management context (Northouse, 2018). I came into this learning process assuming that I was biased in favor of virtue, duty, and utilitarian ethics approaches over the equally significant justice, egoism, and caring ethical orientations (Carroll and Brown, 2022; Muenjohn et al., 2018). Before the week’s learning, I would have responded to the hypothetical case study by immediately canceling the problematic contract once I identified that it was overpriced without considering the other relevant ethical issues of racial justice, fairness, and staff demotivation (Ferrell et al., 2021). However, because of the learning experience during the week, I gained a deeper appreciation of the significance of a situational ethics approach, whereby it is more effective to implement ethical decision-making that considers the entire range of contextual variables defining an ethical dilemma (Trevino and Nelson, 2021). A situational ethics approach facilitates more effective ethical decision-making because it provides an equal balance to all relevant ethical orientations when considering the feasible solutions for an ethical dilemma, including justice, utilitarianism, caring, egoism, duty, and virtue ethics.

So What?

Completing the ethical leadership questionnaire was another significant highlight of the concrete learning experiences I gained throughout the week. The most important aspect of this learning experience was that it allowed me to measure my ethical leadership and identify improvement areas, including the components of ethical leadership I need to improve. The aspect that was most surprising for me after completing the questionnaire was that the scores needed to fully reflect my prior assumptions regarding my ethical orientation as a manager and leader before the week’s learning. As the appendix at the end of the paper illustrates, I score highest in duty, caring, and justice ethics. In contrast, I had initially assumed that my leadership approach is also strongest in virtue and practical ethics. Only my high scores in duty ethics were consistent with my prior assumptions. Additionally, the exercise revealed that I scored zero in egoism and virtue ethics, highlighting these two aspects as the ethical leadership areas I need to focus on in my future leadership development.

Now What?

Overall, I have learned that to be an effective, ethical leader, I need to embrace a holistic leadership development approach that will enable me to change the zero scores in virtue and egoism ethics to higher scores. Although I have compromised my ethics in organizational life, I recognize that improving my virtue leadership score requires me to develop greater knowledge of organizational policies and other sources of positive ethics, such as laws and regulations, to ground my ethical decision-making on what is always virtuous and right. For example, I recognize that situations like conspiracies to falsify financial information do not require situational ethics at all. Understanding what is morally right or unethical in black-and-white ethical dilemmas will help me strengthen my virtue ethics orientation, thereby protecting myWhat?

Kolb’s experiential learning model, which I apply throughout this reflection on my learning in week 3, defines effective learning situations as concrete learning experiences that challenge one’s prior learning and beliefs (Morris, 2020). The learning activities I participated in during week 3 provided a concrete learning experience, particularly because they allowed me to critically appraise my prior understanding and beliefs about business ethics. Specifically, the ethical dilemma case study in the Northouse text concerning Mr. Brown and the PEO that we discussed during the week expanded my comprehension of what constitutes an effective, ethical framework to apply when facing difficult situations in the business management context (Northouse, 2018). I came into this learning process assuming that I was biased in favor of virtue, duty, and utilitarian ethics approaches over the equally significant justice, egoism, and caring ethical orientations (Carroll and Brown, 2022; Muenjohn et al., 2018). Before the week’s learning, I would have responded to the hypothetical case study by immediately canceling the problematic contract once I identified that it was overpriced without considering the other relevant ethical issues of racial justice, fairness, and staff demotivation (Ferrell et al., 2021). However, because of the learning experience during the week, I gained a deeper appreciation of the significance of a situational ethics approach, whereby it is more effective to implement ethical decision-making that considers the entire range of contextual variables defining an ethical dilemma (Trevino and Nelson, 2021). A situational ethics approach facilitates more effective ethical decision-making because it provides an equal balance to all relevant ethical orientations when considering the feasible solutions for an ethical dilemma, including justice, utilitarianism, caring, egoism, duty, and virtue ethics.

So What?

Completing the ethical leadership questionnaire was another significant highlight of the concrete learning experiences I gained throughout the week. The most important aspect of this learning experience was that it allowed me to measure my ethical leadership and identify improvement areas, including the components of ethical leadership I need to improve. The aspect that was most surprising for me after completing the questionnaire was that the scores needed to fully reflect my prior assumptions regarding my ethical orientation as a manager and leader before the week’s learning. As the appendix at the end of the paper illustrates, I score highest in duty, caring, and justice ethics. In contrast, I had initially assumed that my leadership approach is also strongest in virtue and practical ethics. Only my high scores in duty ethics were consistent with my prior assumptions. Additionally, the exercise revealed that I scored zero in egoism and virtue ethics, highlighting these two aspects as the ethical leadership areas I need to focus on in my future leadership development.

Now What?

Overall, I have learned that to be an effective, ethical leader, I need to embrace a holistic leadership development approach that will enable me to change the zero scores in virtue and egoism ethics to higher scores. Although I have compromised my ethics in organizational life, I recognize that improving my virtue leadership score requires me to develop greater knowledge of organizational policies and other sources of positive ethics, such as laws and regulations, to ground my ethical decision-making on what is always virtuous and right. For example, I recognize that situations like conspiracies to falsify financial information do not require situational ethics at all. Understanding what is morally right or unethical in black-and-white ethical dilemmas will help me strengthen my virtue ethics orientation, thereby protecting myWhat?

Kolb’s experiential learning model, which I apply throughout this reflection on my learning in week 3, defines effective learning situations as concrete learning experiences that challenge one’s prior learning and beliefs (Morris, 2020). The learning activities I participated in during week 3 provided a concrete learning experience, particularly because they allowed me to critically appraise my prior understanding and beliefs about business ethics. Specifically, the ethical dilemma case study in the Northouse text concerning Mr. Brown and the PEO that we discussed during the week expanded my comprehension of what constitutes an effective, ethical framework to apply when facing difficult situations in the business management context (Northouse, 2018). I came into this learning process assuming that I was biased in favor of virtue, duty, and utilitarian ethics approaches over the equally significant justice, egoism, and caring ethical orientations (Carroll and Brown, 2022; Muenjohn et al., 2018). Before the week’s learning, I would have responded to the hypothetical case study by immediately canceling the problematic contract once I identified that it was overpriced without considering the other relevant ethical issues of racial justice, fairness, and staff demotivation (Ferrell et al., 2021). However, because of the learning experience during the week, I gained a deeper appreciation of the significance of a situational ethics approach, whereby it is more effective to implement ethical decision-making that considers the entire range of contextual variables defining an ethical dilemma (Trevino and Nelson, 2021). A situational ethics approach facilitates more effective ethical decision-making because it provides an equal balance to all relevant ethical orientations when considering the feasible solutions for an ethical dilemma, including justice, utilitarianism, caring, egoism, duty, and virtue ethics.

So What?

Completing the ethical leadership questionnaire was another significant highlight of the concrete learning experiences I gained throughout the week. The most important aspect of this learning experience was that it allowed me to measure my ethical leadership and identify improvement areas, including the components of ethical leadership I need to improve. The aspect that was most surprising for me after completing the questionnaire was that the scores needed to fully reflect my prior assumptions regarding my ethical orientation as a manager and leader before the week’s learning. As the appendix at the end of the paper illustrates, I score highest in duty, caring, and justice ethics. In contrast, I had initially assumed that my leadership approach is also strongest in virtue and practical ethics. Only my high scores in duty ethics were consistent with my prior assumptions. Additionally, the exercise revealed that I scored zero in egoism and virtue ethics, highlighting these two aspects as the ethical leadership areas I need to focus on in my future leadership development.

Now What?

Overall, I have learned that to be an effective, ethical leader, I need to embrace a holistic leadership development approach that will enable me to change the zero scores in virtue and egoism ethics to higher scores. Although I have compromised my ethics in organizational life, I recognize that improving my virtue leadership score requires me to develop greater knowledge of organizational policies and other sources of positive ethics, such as laws and regulations, to ground my ethical decision-making on what is always virtuous and right. For example, I recognize that situations like conspiracies to falsify financial information do not require situational ethics at all. Understanding what is morally right or unethical in black-and-white ethical dilemmas will help me strengthen my virtue ethics orientation, thereby protecting myWhat?

Kolb’s experiential learning model, which I apply throughout this reflection on my learning in week 3, defines effective learning situations as concrete learning experiences that challenge one’s prior learning and beliefs (Morris, 2020). The learning activities I participated in during week 3 provided a concrete learning experience, particularly because they allowed me to critically appraise my prior understanding and beliefs about business ethics. Specifically, the ethical dilemma case study in the Northouse text concerning Mr. Brown and the PEO that we discussed during the week expanded my comprehension of what constitutes an effective, ethical framework to apply when facing difficult situations in the business management context (Northouse, 2018). I came into this learning process assuming that I was biased in favor of virtue, duty, and utilitarian ethics approaches over the equally significant justice, egoism, and caring ethical orientations (Carroll and Brown, 2022; Muenjohn et al., 2018). Before the week’s learning, I would have responded to the hypothetical case study by immediately canceling the problematic contract once I identified that it was overpriced without considering the other relevant ethical issues of racial justice, fairness, and staff demotivation (Ferrell et al., 2021). However, because of the learning experience during the week, I gained a deeper appreciation of the significance of a situational ethics approach, whereby it is more effective to implement ethical decision-making that considers the entire range of contextual variables defining an ethical dilemma (Trevino and Nelson, 2021). A situational ethics approach facilitates more effective ethical decision-making because it provides an equal balance to all relevant ethical orientations when considering the feasible solutions for an ethical dilemma, including justice, utilitarianism, caring, egoism, duty, and virtue ethics.

So What?

Completing the ethical leadership questionnaire was another significant highlight of the concrete learning experiences I gained throughout the week. The most important aspect of this learning experience was that it allowed me to measure my ethical leadership and identify improvement areas, including the components of ethical leadership I need to improve. The aspect that was most surprising for me after completing the questionnaire was that the scores needed to fully reflect my prior assumptions regarding my ethical orientation as a manager and leader before the week’s learning. As the appendix at the end of the paper illustrates, I score highest in duty, caring, and justice ethics. In contrast, I had initially assumed that my leadership approach is also strongest in virtue and practical ethics. Only my high scores in duty ethics were consistent with my prior assumptions. Additionally, the exercise revealed that I scored zero in egoism and virtue ethics, highlighting these two aspects as the ethical leadership areas I need to focus on in my future leadership development.

Now What?

Overall, I have learned that to be an effective, ethical leader, I need to embrace a holistic leadership development approach that will enable me to change the zero scores in virtue and egoism ethics to higher scores. Although I have compromised my ethics in organizational life, I recognize that improving my virtue leadership score requires me to develop greater knowledge of organizational policies and other sources of positive ethics, such as laws and regulations, to ground my ethical decision-making on what is always virtuous and right. For example, I recognize that situations like conspiracies to falsify financial information do not require situational ethics at all. Understanding what is morally right or unethical in black-and-white ethical dilemmas will help me strengthen my virtue ethics orientation, thereby protecting myWhat?

Kolb’s experiential learning model, which I apply throughout this reflection on my learning in week 3, defines effective learning situations as concrete learning experiences that challenge one’s prior learning and beliefs (Morris, 2020). The learning activities I participated in during week 3 provided a concrete learning experience, particularly because they allowed me to critically appraise my prior understanding and beliefs about business ethics. Specifically, the ethical dilemma case study in the Northouse text concerning Mr. Brown and the PEO that we discussed during the week expanded my comprehension of what constitutes an effective, ethical framework to apply when facing difficult situations in the business management context (Northouse, 2018). I came into this learning process assuming that I was biased in favor of virtue, duty, and utilitarian ethics approaches over the equally significant justice, egoism, and caring ethical orientations (Carroll and Brown, 2022; Muenjohn et al., 2018). Before the week’s learning, I would have responded to the hypothetical case study by immediately canceling the problematic contract once I identified that it was overpriced without considering the other relevant ethical issues of racial justice, fairness, and staff demotivation (Ferrell et al., 2021). However, because of the learning experience during the week, I gained a deeper appreciation of the significance of a situational ethics approach, whereby it is more effective to implement ethical decision-making that considers the entire range of contextual variables defining an ethical dilemma (Trevino and Nelson, 2021). A situational ethics approach facilitates more effective ethical decision-making because it provides an equal balance to all relevant ethical orientations when considering the feasible solutions for an ethical dilemma, including justice, utilitarianism, caring, egoism, duty, and virtue ethics.

So What?

Completing the ethical leadership questionnaire was another significant highlight of the concrete learning experiences I gained throughout the week. The most important aspect of this learning experience was that it allowed me to measure my ethical leadership and identify improvement areas, including the components of ethical leadership I need to improve. The aspect that was most surprising for me after completing the questionnaire was that the scores needed to fully reflect my prior assumptions regarding my ethical orientation as a manager and leader before the week’s learning. As the appendix at the end of the paper illustrates, I score highest in duty, caring, and justice ethics. In contrast, I had initially assumed that my leadership approach is also strongest in virtue and practical ethics. Only my high scores in duty ethics were consistent with my prior assumptions. Additionally, the exercise revealed that I scored zero in egoism and virtue ethics, highlighting these two aspects as the ethical leadership areas I need to focus on in my future leadership development.

Now What?

Overall, I have learned that to be an effective, ethical leader, I need to embrace a holistic leadership development approach that will enable me to change the zero scores in virtue and egoism ethics to higher scores. Although I have compromised my ethics in organizational life, I recognize that improving my virtue leadership score requires me to develop greater knowledge of organizational policies and other sources of positive ethics, such as laws and regulations, to ground my ethical decision-making on what is always virtuous and right. For example, I recognize that situations like conspiracies to falsify financial information do not require situational ethics at all. Understanding what is morally right or unethical in black-and-white ethical dilemmas will help me strengthen my virtue ethics orientation, thereby protecting my 

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